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The 27 Most Breathtaking Places in United States

Posted on Sep 22, 2014 by in NATURAL WONDERS, ROAD TRIPS, SPOTLIGHT | 0 comments

1. Mendenhall Glacier Caves, Alaska
Mendenhall Glacier is a glacier about 12 miles (19 km) long located in Mendenhall Valley, about 12 miles (19 km) from downtown Juneau in the southeast area of the U.S. state of Alaska. The glacier and surrounding landscape is protected as the 5,815-acre Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area, a federally designated unit of the Tongass National Forest.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mendenhall_Glacier

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2. Antelope Canyon, Arizona
Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon in the American Southwest. It is located on Navajo land near Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, photogenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as Upper Antelope Canyon or The Crack; and Lower Antelope Canyon or The Corkscrew.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antelope_Canyon

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3. Oneonta Gorge, Oregon
The Oneonta Gorge is in the Columbia River Gorge in the American state of Oregon. The U.S. Forest Service has designated it as a botanical area because of the unique aquatic and woodland plants that grow there. Exposed walls of 25 million year old (Miocene epoch) basalt are home to a wide variety of ferns, mosses, hepatics and lichens, many of which grow only in the Columbia River Gorge. Oneonta Gorge has been described as “one of the true dramatic chasms in the state.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oneonta_Gorge

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4.Skagit Valley Tulip Fields, Washington
The Skagit Valley Tulip Festival is a spring Tulip Festival in the Skagit Valley of Washington State. It is held annually, April 1 to April 30.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skagit_Valley_Tulip_Festival

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5. Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, Colorado
The Maroon Bells–Snowmass Wilderness is a U.S. Wilderness Area located in the Elk Mountains of central Colorado. The 181,535-acre (734.65 km2) wilderness was established in 1980 in the Gunnison and White River national forests. Within its boundaries are 100 miles (160 km) of trails, 6 of Colorado’s fourteeners and 9 passes over 12,000 feet (3,700 m). The wilderness is named after the two peaks known as the Maroon Bells as well as Snowmass Mountain.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maroon_Bells%E2%80%93Snowmass_Wilderness

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6. Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida
The Dry Tortugas are a small group of islands, located at the end of the Florida Keys, USA, about 67 miles (108 km) west of Key West, and 37 miles (60 km) west of the Marquesas Keys, the closest islands. Still further west is the Tortugas Bank, which is completely submerged. The first Europeans to discover the islands were the Spanish in 1513, led by explorer Juan Ponce de León. They are an unincorporated area of Monroe County, Florida, and belong to the Lower Keys Census County Division. With their surrounding waters, they constitute the Dry Tortugas National Park.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_Tortugas

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7. Zion National Park, Utah
Zion National Park is located in the Southwestern United States, near Springdale, Utah. A prominent feature of the 229-square-mile (590 km2) park is Zion Canyon, which is 15 miles (24 km) long and up to half a mile (800 m) deep, cut through the reddish and tan-colored Navajo Sandstone by the North Fork of the Virgin River. The lowest elevation is 3,666 ft (1,117 m) at Coalpits Wash and the highest elevation is 8,726 ft (2,660 m) at Horse Ranch Mountain. Located at the junction of the Colorado Plateau, Great Basin, and Mojave Desert regions, the park’s unique geography and variety of life zones allow for unusual plant and animal diversity. Numerous plant species as well as 289 species of birds, 75 mammals (including 19 species of bat), and 32 reptiles inhabit the park’s four life zones: desert, riparian, woodland, and coniferous forest. Zion National Park includes mountains, canyons, buttes, mesas, monoliths, rivers, slot canyons, and natural arches.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zion_National_Park

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8. Watkins Glen State Park, New York
Watkins Glen State Park is located outside the village of Watkins Glen, New York, south of Seneca Lake in Schuyler County in the Finger Lakes region. The park’s lower part is near the village, while the upper part is open woodland. It was opened to the public in 1863 and was privately run as a tourist resort until 1906, when it was purchased by New York State. Since 1924, it has been managed by the Finger Lakes Region of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watkins_Glen_State_Park

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9. Yosemite Valley, California
Yosemite Valley (/joʊˈsɛmɨtiː/ yoh-SEM-i-tee) is a glacial valley in Yosemite National Park in the western Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The valley is about 8 miles (13 km) long and up to a mile deep, surrounded by high granite summits such as Half Dome and El Capitan, and densely forested with pines. The valley is drained by the Merced River and a multitude of streams and waterfalls including Tenaya, Illilouette, Yosemite and Bridalveil Creeks. Yosemite Falls is the highest waterfall in North America, and is a big attraction especially in the Spring when the water flow is at its peak. The valley is renowned for its natural beauty, and is widely regarded as the centerpiece of Yosemite National Park, attracting visitors from around the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yosemite_Valley

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10. Grand Prismatic Spring, Wyoming
The Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park is the largest hot spring in the United States, and the third largest in the world, after Frying Pan Lake in New Zealand and Boiling Lake in Dominica. It is located in the Midway Geyser Basin.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Prismatic_Spring

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11. Haiku Stairs of Oahu, Hawaii
The Haʻikū Stairs, also known as the Stairway to Heaven or Haʻikū Ladder, is a steep hiking trail on the island of Oʻahu.
The trail began as a wooden ladder spiked to the cliff on the south side of the Haʻikū Valley. It was installed in 1942 to enable antenna cables to be strung from one side of the cliffs above Haʻikū Valley to the other. A building to provide a continuous communication link between Wahiawā and Haʻikū Valley Naval Radio Station was constructed at the peak of Puʻukeahiakahoe, elevation about 2,800 feet (850 m). The antennas transmitted very low frequency radio signals from a 200,000-watt Alexanderson alternator in the center of Haʻikū valley. The signals could reach US Navy submarines as far away as Tokyo Bay while the submarines were submerged.Testers for RCA picked up signals on Long Island, and the signal also reached India, 6,600 miles (10,600 km) away.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku_Stairs

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12. Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico
Carlsbad Caverns National Park is a United States National Park in the Guadalupe Mountains in southeastern New Mexico. The primary attraction of the park is the show cave, Carlsbad Cavern. Carlsbad Caverns National Park is open every day of the year except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. Visitors to the cave can hike in on their own via the natural entrance or take an elevator from the visitor center.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlsbad_Caverns_National_Park

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13. Whitaker Point, Arkansas
The Hawksbill Crag, also known as Whitaker Point, is located along the northern edge of the Upper Buffalo Wilderness in the Ozark National Forest, just south of the Buffalo National River. It is easily one of the most photograped and recognizable features in Arkansas, and is often seen on publications depicting the outdoors in Arkansas. The hike to it is an easy 3.0 mile round trip, and offers scenic vistas, huge boulders, beautiful waterfalls and colorful wildflowers.
http://www.exploretheozarksonline.com/activities/parksnature/nationalforests/ozark/bigpiney/upperbuffalo/hawksbillcrag.html

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14. Hamilton Pool, Texas
Hamilton Pool Preserve is a natural pool that was created when the dome of an underground river collapsed due to massive erosion thousands of years ago. The pool is located about 23 miles (37 km) west of Austin, Texas off Highway 71. Since the 1960s, Hamilton Pool has been a popular summer swimming spot for Austin visitors and residents. Hamilton Pool Preserve consists of 232 acres (0.94 km2) of protected natural habitat featuring a jade green pool into which a 50-foot (15 m) waterfall flows. The pool is surrounded by large slabs of limestone that rest by the water’s edge; large stalactites grow from the ceiling high above. The ceiling and surrounding cliffs of the grotto are home to moss, maidenhair fern and cliff swallows. The Ashe juniper (cedar) uplands of the preserve are home to the endangered golden-cheeked warbler.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamilton_Pool_Preserve

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15. Horseshoe Bend, Arizona
Horseshoe Bend is the name for a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona, in the United States.
Horseshoe Bend is located 5 miles (8.0 km) downstream from the Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Powell within Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, about 4 miles (6.4 km) southwest of Page.
It is accessible via a 1.1 miles (1.8 km) hike from U.S. Route 89 but an access road does reach the geological structure as it is part of a state park. The Horseshoe Bend can be viewed from the steep cliff above.
According to Google terrain maps, the overlook is 4,200 feet (1,300 m) above sea level and the Colorado River is at 3,200 feet (980 m) above sea level making it a 1,000 feet (300 m) drop.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horseshoe_Bend_(Arizona)

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16. Northern Lights, Alaska
Alaska is one of the best places on earth to see the northern lights – colorful bands of light that dance in the dark night sky. Travelers from all over the world come to Alaska each winter to see this stunning display and take advantage of other winter experiences like snowmobiling, dog mushing, skiing, festivals and sporting events.
http://www.travelalaska.com/things%20to%20do/winter%20activities/northernlightsviewing.aspx

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17. Bryce Canyon, Utah
Bryce Canyon National Park /ˈbraɪs/ is a national park located in southwestern Utah in the United States. The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon, which despite its name, is not a canyon but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. Bryce is distinctive due to geological structures called hoodoos, formed by frost weathering and stream erosion of the river and lake bed sedimentary rocks. The red, orange, and white colors of the rocks provide spectacular views for park visitors. Bryce sits at a much higher elevation than nearby Zion National Park. The rim at Bryce varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet (2,400 to 2,700 m).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryce_Canyon_National_Park

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18. Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada
Lake Tahoe (/ˈtɑːhoʊ/; Washo: dáʔaw) is a large freshwater lake in the Sierra Nevada of the United States. At a surface elevation of 6,225 ft (1,897 m), it is located along the border between California and Nevada, west of Carson City. Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in North America.[5] Its depth is 1,645 ft (501 m), making it the deepest in the United States after Crater Lake (1,945 ft (593 m)). Additionally, Lake Tahoe is the sixth largest lake by volume in the United States at 122,160,280 acre·ft (150,682,490 dam3), behind the five Great Lakes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Tahoe

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19. Smoky Mountains, North Carolina/Tennessee
The Great Smoky Mountains are a mountain range rising along the Tennessee–North Carolina border in the southeastern United States. They are a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains, and form part of the Blue Ridge Physiographic Province. The range is sometimes called the Smoky Mountains and the name is commonly shortened to the Smokies. The Great Smokies are best known as the home of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which protects most of the range. The park was established in 1934, and, with over 9 million visits per year, it is the most-visited national park in the United States.[
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Smoky_Mountains

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20. Niagara Falls, New York
Niagara Falls (/naɪˈæɡrə/, Cayuga: Gahnawehtaˀ or Tgahnawęhtaˀ[1]) is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the international border between Canada and the United States; more specifically, between the province of Ontario and the state of New York. They form the southern end of the Niagara Gorge.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niagara_Falls

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21. The Wave, Arizona
The Wave is a sandstone rock formation located in the United States of America near the Arizona-Utah border, on the slopes of the Coyote Buttes, in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, on the Colorado Plateau. It is famous among hikers and photographers for its colorful, undulating forms, and the rugged, trackless hike required to reach it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wave,_Arizona

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22. Sequoia National Park, California
Sequoia National Park is a national park in the southern Sierra Nevada east of Visalia, California, in the United States. It was established on September 25, 1890. The park spans 404,063 acres (631.35 sq mi; 1,635.18 km2).Encompassing a vertical relief of nearly 13,000 feet (4,000 m), the park contains among its natural resources the highest point in the contiguous 48 United States, Mount Whitney, at 14,505 feet (4,421 m) above sea level. The park is south of and contiguous with Kings Canyon National Park; the two are administered by the National Park Service together as the Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequoia_National_Park

Sequoia National Park in California

23. Thor’s Well, Oregon
“Thor’s Well is part of Cape Perpetua, a typical Pacific Northwest headland – a forested area of land on the central Oregon Coast, surrounded by water on three sides. Thor’s Well is also often simply called the Spouting Horn. It is essentially a huge salt water fountain operated by the Pacific Ocean’s power.This natural spectacle is at its best when it’s the most dangerous to watch – at high tide or during winter storms.
https://roadtrippers.com/us/or/nature/thors-well-cape-perpetua

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24. Savannah, Georgia
Savannah is the oldest city in the U.S. state of Georgia and the county seat of Chatham County. Established in 1733, the city of Savannah became the British colonial capital of the Province of Georgia and later the first state capital of Georgia. A strategic port city in the American Revolution and during the American Civil War, Savannah is today an industrial center and an important Atlantic seaport. It is Georgia’s fifth-largest city and third-largest metropolitan area.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savannah,_Georgia

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25. Palouse Falls, Washington
Palouse Falls State Park is a 105-acre (0.42 km2) member of the Washington state park system in the Palouse region of Eastern Washington, USA. It is named for the 200-foot (61 m) Palouse Falls on the Palouse River, which are part of the park.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palouse_Falls_State_Park

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26. Glacier National Park, Montana
Glacier National Park is a national park located in the U.S. state of Montana, on the Canada–United States border with the Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia. The park encompasses over 1 million acres (4,000 km2) and includes parts of two mountain ranges (sub-ranges of the Rocky Mountains), over 130 named lakes, more than 1,000 different species of plants, and hundreds of species of animals. This vast pristine ecosystem is the centerpiece of what has been referred to as the “Crown of the Continent Ecosystem”, a region of protected land encompassing 16,000 square miles (41,000 km2).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glacier_National_Park_(U.S.)

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27. Devil’s Tower, Wyoming
Devils Tower (Lakota: Matȟó Thípila (“Bear Lodge”) or Ptehé Ǧí (“Brown Buffalo Horn”) (Arapaho: Wox Niiinon) is an igneous intrusion or laccolith in the Bear Lodge Mountains (part of the Black Hills) near Hulett and Sundance in Crook County, northeastern Wyoming, above the Belle Fourche River. It rises dramatically 1,267 feet (386 m) above the surrounding terrain and the summit is 5,114 feet (1,559 m) above sea level.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devils_Tower

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